Utilities Extension Project

400 Santa Barbara Blvd. Cape Coral, FL 33991
239.574.0558

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  • x Eastern Indigo Snake Poster
  • x Eastern Indigo Snake Poster
  • x Eastern Indigo Snake Poster

EASTERN INDIGO SNAKE

A LEGALLY PROTECTED SPECIES
UNDER STATE AND FEDERAL LAW THAT MAY INHABIT THIS CITY

 

Description

The eastern indigo snake is a nonpoisonous state and federally protected species. It is shiny, blue-black in color with white, coral, rust or reddish color around the chin, throat, and cheeks. It is a thick-bodied snake that averages 6 feet in length and can grow to 8.6 feet. Young are similar to adults but some are lighter and show a blotched dorsal pattern.

 

Where They Are Found

Indigo snakes are most often found along the edges of swamps and marshes and in pine flatwoods and hardwoods communities where food is abundant. However, this snake is considered a commensal species of the gopher tortoise, which means it may be found in the project area, as it relies upon gopher tortoise burrows for refuge. It is generally active during the day and feeds on fish, frogs, toads, lizards, small turtles, birds, and small mammals.

 

If You See an Eastern Indigo Snake

  1. Cease construction and do not disturb it. Any disturbance of this snake’s activity is prohibited.
  2. The snake should be allowed sufficient time to move away from the site or be relocated by a qualified wildlife biologist before any work is resumed. Only a qualified wildlife biologist  is permitted to come in contact with the snake. Work can resume after it has moved from the area or has been relocated by a qualified wildlife biologist.
  3. If a dead eastern indigo snake is found, the specimen should be thoroughly soaked in water and frozen immediately. Sightings of eastern indigo snakes should be reported immediately to a qualified wildlife biologist.

 

Violations of state and federal law are punishable by fines and/or imprisonment.